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Clicking MENU offers folders now! Meanwhile getting my ebook sold, crafting a second one, and doing minimal micro-poetry is all I do online on a regular. The Bank wants that botched loan repaid, and I want that plus rebuilding my life after a winter as one of the urban homeless. Physical labor, and the craftsmen way of life were my first new ‘job’.

ISBN: 9788892532632

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Heavenly Shades of Night Are Falling*

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Confessions of a Mystery Novelist...

fear-of-the-darkWe all have our fears, and sometimes even phobias. One of the more common fears people have is fear of the dark. For those people, the scene in the ‘photo you see isn’t peaceful or romantic. It’s frightening. If you think about it, fear of the dark is understandable. Things and places look different in the dark, even if they’re familiar. Shadows can take on different dimensions and look a lot more threatening. And if you consider our origins as a species, there are certainly predators that came (and still come) out at night. So a heightened feeling of danger at night probably made sense. And plenty of people still prefer daylight.

That instinctive reaction to the dark plays a role in crime fiction, and that shouldn’t be surprising. Among other things, weaving fear of the dark into a story allows the author to create a tense atmosphere, and tap…

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Try to Find Equilibrium*

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Confessions of a Mystery Novelist...

equilibrium-and-disequilibriumIf theorists such as Jean Piaget are right, it’s human nature to want equilibrium. We want things to be in balance and to make sense. We want some sort of order. If you think about it, that drive for equilibrium arguably fuels many of our actions. We’re curious (which throws us into disequilibrium because we don’t know something). So, we seek to learn, or to find out about something. Or, perhaps we move to a new home. That throws us into disequilibrium until we unpack, put our things where we want them, and find out where the local library and the grocery stores are. Then, as we settle in, we impose new order on our lives and are back into equilibrium. And the list of examples could go on.

For any story, the drive for equilibrium can be an effective way to construct the action. The protagonist starts out in…

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Fantastische Mini-Geschichte: Das schwarze Auge – Dunkle Offenbarungen.

Dunkle Offenbarungen – Alrik mal alternativ betrachtet. © Andrè M. Pietroschek, alle Rechte vorbehalten Seemann Jogas Walson hatte sich zuviel gefallen lassen, das stand ihm fest. Kein Gebet, und auch kein Wehklagen bei der Wache hatten da geholfen. Wie alle armen Leute konnte er von … Continue reading Fantastische Mini-Geschichte: Das schwarze Auge – Dunkle Offenbarungen.

The Man Said, Why Do You Think You’re Here?*

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Confessions of a Mystery Novelist...

counselingPolice work and other criminal investigation can take a real toll on a person. After all, these people see the worst that humans can do to each other, and that can leave scars. Even the most sane, balanced person can get pushed to the breaking point under those circumstances.

That’s why many police departments have psychologists, either on their staff or as professional associates. Of course, that doesn’t mean that the detectives will actually use those services unless required. There’s still, to some extent, a stigma attached to getting mental health care. But more and more, people are seeing the wisdom of getting such support when it’s necessary. And that aspect of police work – the aftermath of a case – can make a fictional character more human and believable.

For example, in Michael Connelly’s The Last Coyote, LAPD detective Harry Bosch is at the end of his proverbial…

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